It’s all about the run…

It’s all about the run…

When I like something, I want everybody to try it. I can’t help it. For many years, I’ve campaigned for yoga and found ways to lure my friends into a yoga class. Be warned! Here comes the next crusade, and this time it’s all about the run. Yes, I’m still on a high after running my first 10K race yesterday but it’s not just adrenaline talking. Running is good for you, if you train properly. And I have the best trainer ever, Peter – so good I’m going to marry him next month but that’s beside the point. Anyway I started to run last September. I was doing lots of yoga but no cardio vascular training and I often felt some fluttering in my chest. I realised I need to strengthen my heart. After my first running attempt, which must have been max 1.2 K, I was short of breath and Peter was a bit worried. He got me to run very short distances for what seemed like eternity. So I ran around the block again and again, slightly afraid that my neighbours would get suspicious. I didn’t think I could ever run more than 3K. But we slowly increased the distance and in November I ran my first 5K. Hurrah! Over the winter, I couldn’t train because of colds and sore throats.Peter had registered me for a run in January but I had to postpone it and eventually cancel it as I didn’t feel I could run more than 5K. But from May onwards, I had an objective: to run the London Vitality 10K race on July 10th for a...
Chronically well…

Chronically well…

Today I would like to share a blog written by Sarah: Chronically Well. Sarah introduces the OMS recovery programme in her blog entry of February 19th. She also has lots of articles about juicing, research news as well as recipes and a library! I love her tone. It is so refreshing and pleasant to read as well as informative: a pleasure to read. So please go and check it out. Here is the address of Sarah’s blog: http://chronicallywell.blogspot.co.uk/ Thank you Sarah.    ...
MS Hug (George)

MS Hug (George)

“Do not be satisfied with the stories that come before you. Unfold your own book.” (Rumi) George first visited me ten years ago. Sitting – or slumping – at my desk, I was pondering how European integration shaped the Irish national system of innovation. It was a real pleasure at the time… I loved manipulating concepts, turning ideas over, stretching them and let them bounce back. But although I spent endless hours researching this topic, I happily let it go after the viva. Not by lack of interest, more to preserve my mental health. I get so depressed when I see how little we learned from the past. Why do we keep making the same mistakes? What about the ones pulling the strings of the world economy, do they have no conscience at all? But let’s go back to George. Let’s go back to 2002, to my computer and to Douglass North’s article “Where have we been and where are we going?” “In the historical success stories of institutional adaptation, the belief system of the players filtered the information from current experiences and interpreted it in ways that induced choices that led to the modification, alteration, or adoption of institutions that resolved existing problems or led to improvements in competitive performance.” Douglass North is one of my favourite institutional economists because he takes the human factor into account. And I find his articles reassuring. But today, I feel a slight discomfort. Maybe it’s my posture. I really have to pay more attention unless I wish to become hunchbacked. I sit up. The discomfort persists. It may be stress-related too....
Patient or Warrior? By Cindy Lee

Patient or Warrior? By Cindy Lee

Cindy Lee is a writer, mother, and lover of life who has discovered that a twenty year dance with MS, has given her Multiple Strengths.  She writes about love, laughter, healing and hope. Check her blog: http://stillsexyafterms.com/ The word patient implies weakness, illness and being out of control. Being not-in-charge of your own well-being. Accepting this patient label and repeating it, can alone set you back on your path of wellness. My life changed on that rainy afternoon when I was told by an insensitive, ill-tempered doctor I had multiple sclerosis. I drove home numb, shocked and disconnected even from the blaring horn of a car nearby that I cut off in traffic did not even see. Everything I thought I was had suddenly changed and turned into one ugly word. I had become a patient. In that twenty-minute drive from the city to my suburban bungalow, I was changing with every rainy mile. As the wipers washed away the rain, my mind was washing away all the goals and dreams I had for my future. Twenty years later, I can now look back and see how that word had totally transformed me. I had become a victim. I had become a burden to my loved ones. I had become someone I no longer recognized. I can still remember how I felt when the phone calls started coming in from concerned family members and friends. I was not up to answering the endless inquiries, so my concerned mother was left to ward off the vultures. I felt like I had died. I was listening to calls of condolences. It was bad enough being...